Another Spectrum

Personal ramblings and rants of a somewhat twisted mind

Too Hot!

15 Comments

Since returning from our holiday in Japan a little over a month ago, I’m beginning to wonder if somehow we’ve moved into a parallel dimension.

The people look and behave the same, places look the same, even the politicians seem the same (although the government has changed). What is different is the weather. It’s not New Zealand weather as I know it.

Aotearoa New Zealand is well know for its temperate climate. Not too cold in winter. Not too hot in summer. The average daily maximum temperature in December in my home town is 20°C (68℉), But not one day this month has the maximum daily temperature been below 24°C (75°F). I started writing the piece late morning and already the thermometer is at 23 24 25°C (77°F) outside and climbing. According to my weather station, the maximum temperature so far this month has been 34°.3C (93.7°F)!

Perhaps if you reside on or near a continental land mass, you’re wondering what the fuss is all about but weather in Aotearoa New Zealand can change unexpectedly, and newcomers to NZ frequently get caught out. Sustained high or low temperatures feel oppressive when one lives where daily temperature variations can be as large as seasonal variations, and it’s not unusual to experience four seasons in one day.

And I suspect being an Aspie doesn’t help the situation. For me, anything below 15°C (59°C) is cold, and a trigger for the symptoms of Raynaud syndrome. Anything above 23°C (76°F) and I begin to sweat profusely, and within a relatively short time I’m saturated. As I’m unable to use any antiperspirants (hypersensitive skin), the result isn’t pretty.

When hot, I find clothing extremely uncomfortable – especially typical NZ male attire. I’ve resorted to wearing a yukata in an attempt to make life more bearable. It definitely helps.

The MetService (meteorological bureau) informs us that this summer is going to be exceptionally hot, dry and windy. Already many regions have seen new seasonal records set and it’s barely mid December! Ocean temperature in many places is 2°C warmer than normal for this time of year and toxic algal bloom is affecting the gathering of kaimoana (seafood) in some areas. Not good.

There’s another issue  I have with the summer season: hay-fever. It’s started somewhat earlier this year than normal. Typically it doesn’t start until mid to late December, but this year it started in mid November. For me it lasts continuously for around two months. Let’s hope that this year will be the same – over in mid January instead of the usual late February.

If you get the impression I’m not fond of summer, you’d be right. Roll on Autumn!

Author: Barry

A post war baby boomer from Aotearoa New Zealand who has lived with migraines for as long as I can remember and was diagnosed as being autistic aged sixty. I blog because in real life I'm somewhat backwards about coming forward with my opinions.

15 thoughts on “Too Hot!

  1. Barry, reading about the weather variations in NZ, reminded me about this satirical piece by Mark Twain on New England’s spring weather

    I reverently believe that the Maker who made us all makes everything in New England but the weather. I don’t know who makes that, but I think it must be raw apprentices in the weather-clerk’s factory who experiment and learn how, in New England, for board and clothes, and then are promoted to make weather for countries that require a good article, and will take their custom elsewhere if they don’t get it.

    There is a sumptuous variety about the New England weather that compels the stranger’s admiration — and regret. The weather is always doing something there; always attending strictly to business; always getting up new designs and trying them on the people to see how they will go. But it gets through more business in spring than in any other season.

    In the spring I have counted one hundred and thirty-six different kinds of weather inside of four-and-twenty hours. It was I that made the fame and fortune of that man that had that marvelous collection of weather on exhibition at the Centennial, that so astounded the foreigners. He was going to travel all over the world and get specimens from all the climes. I said, “Don’t you do it; you come to New England on a favorable spring day.” I told him what we could do in the way of style, variety, and quantity. Well, he came and he made his collection in four days. As to variety, why, he confessed that he got hundreds of kinds of weather that he had never heard of before. And as to quantity — well, after he had picked out and discarded all that was blemished in any way, he not only had weather enough, but weather to spare; weather to hire out; weather to sell; to deposit; weather to invest; weather to give to the poor.

  2. Your normal sounds Scots, slightly cooler than I am used to having moved South. We had snow on Sunday, it lay for a bit, but has all melted since dawn today.

    • I don’t mind the occasional 25+ day, but not for weeks in a row.

      As far as a comparison with Scotland is concerned, our winter’s are more mild. It does snow where we live. Twice in the last 30 years. Once in September, and once on Christmas eve! We have around 10 frosts each year and daytime temperatures seldom drop below 10 degrees.

  3. I need to come visit you for awhile. Right now, our temperature in Buffalo, NY is about 15 degrees Fahrenheit, in the sun. Then when the seasons change and your winter is our summer, you can come visit me. (I always find it a little strange that some people are in the opposite season from the one I’m in – and that the internet lets me communicate with those people in real time. And I don’t have to pay long-distance charges!)

    • I guess because 9 out of 10 people live in the northern hemisphere, and almost all literature, movies, TV shows are created in and for that market, we are far more aware of the seasonal differences. For example around 70% of TV show we watch come from the US or the UK.

      I’m not sure if I’d enjoy a Buffalo summer. as it’s much hotter than ours. Myweather2.com says this about July in Buffalo: Comfort Levels: Given average maximum temperatures and humidity levels caution is advised. Fatigue is possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity for those in high risk groups of possible heat disorders.
      Whereas for January in Palmerston North (the nearest city to my home town of Feilding), it says this: Comfort Levels: Given average maximum temperatures and humidity levels generally you should not anticipate any discomfort from heat

      I think a spring/autumn visit would be much kinder to me 🙂

  4. Pingback: Murphy has a lot to answer for | Another Spectrum

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