Another Spectrum

Personal ramblings and rants of a somewhat twisted mind

When Is It Okay to Chain Your Child to a Bed?

2 Comments

When will the world stop thinking of those who care for the differently abled as victims, when in reality it is the person who is being care for that is frequently the victim?

Unstrange Mind

chain with padlockThe answer should be obvious, right? Never. Never is it okay to chain your child to a bed and leave him alone, crying out for someone to give him water.

This is what happened in Australia where a mother chained her 16-year-old Autistic son to the bed and left him there alone while she went to the store. If you are upset for that young man, good! You should be! I’m upset on his behalf but I’m also upset and disturbed that, once again, I witness the trend of empathizing with the abusive parent and virtually ignoring everything about the child.

The Facebook administrator for Autism Awareness Australia gave mere lip service to the suffering of the young man and focused most of the spotlight on the mother:

A horrific story…..for everyone involved. Whilst no parent should do this to their child, we can only imagine the desperate situation this…

View original post 1,299 more words

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Author: Barry

A post war baby boomer from Aotearoa New Zealand who has lived with migraines for as long as I can remember and was diagnosed as being autistic aged sixty. I blog because in real life I'm somewhat backwards about coming forward with my opinions.

2 thoughts on “When Is It Okay to Chain Your Child to a Bed?

  1. I hear you Barry, or rather I hear the horror being expressed in this reblog, and it is indeed horrifying. As a culture however, we have to start recognizing how challenging and difficult it is to be a caregiver. I work as one, mostly providing respite and relief from primary caregivers, so they don’t become over burdened.

    Society is really good at pointing fingers at the atrocities, but not so good at being there long before things get really bad. We have little or no respect for those who care for people and we tend to act like it is an easy job. It isn’t. I myself work very limited hours, no more than 25 a week, and no more than two 24 hour shifts in a month. People who look after children, family members, are often working 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with no pay or benefits at all.

    The reason we empathize with the parent, the caregiver, is because that is who you must empathize with in order to prevent these things from happening. That is the person you have to fix.

    • I think you are missing the point. Whenever discussion about the abuse of autistics occurs, the empathy is invariably for the perpetrator and seldom for the victim except as a secondary consideration. There is very little empathy for the difficulty an autistic faces in living in a neurotypical world. I can vouch for the fact that it’s as difficult for the autistic, if not more so, as it is for a perpetrator. If the victim had been “normal”, but subject to the same abuse, where would the public’s empathy lie? I am certain it would not be for the perpetrator. Why should this case be any different?

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